Sugar…What is so bad about it?

SugarI am continuing to hear about all the bad things on what sugar does to the body.  I have decided to do some research into this favorite delightful tasty treat and see what is so bad about it. Here is what I am finding…

Sugar is a natural ingredient that has been in our diets for thousands of years. It is a simple carbohydrate and when broken down it provides energy to the body. How fast or slow it’s broken down is the key and makes all the difference in how our bodies respond to it. Anything thing that ends in “ose” is sugar. The most common sugars are:

Sucrose: table sugar which is made of glucose and fructose. It is extracted from sugarcane and is found in fruits and veggies.

Fructose and glucose: are found in fruits, honey, and veggies.

Lactose is called milk sugar because it is found in milk and dairy products.

Maltose is known as malt sugar and is found in malted drinks and beer.

There is a difference between refined and processed sugars such as table sugar and unprocessed sugars that are naturally found in fruits and veggies. Unprocessed sugars contain help promoting nutrients that break down at a slower rate. While refined sugars such as candy and baked goods do not have health benefits and break down at a faster rated which is not good.

Natural sugars, when eaten in balance with other healthy foods, are more health-promoting. This can make natural sugars nutrient-dense food.  Eating processed sugars are always health-depleting and are empty-calorie foods. Processed sugars also rob the body of essential nutrients and can leave the body nutrient-deficit.  They have no B vitamins, chromium, magnesium, zinc or other minerals that the body needs to digest and metabolize.

I have craved sugar for some time now, and I am just starting to really realize that refined sugar can destroy the body.   There is much more information to come…stay tuned as I continue to figure out the sugar craze.

Some Science Behind Gratitude

Science of GratitudeAccording to researchers at Indiana University, the mental benefits of gratitude include:

  • Decreased feelings of anxiety and depression
  • Individuals have a better ability to cope with stress
  • Feelings of individuals are more confident and have more self-worth
  • Individual have generally higher feelings of happiness
  • Individuals who practice gratitude may even rewire the brain to be more sensitive to experiences gratitude

They also found that there are physical benefits associated with having an attitude of gratitude such as:

  • Improved cardiac health
  • Decreased blood pressure
  • Better sleep habits
  • Quicker recovery from illness
  • Increased energy

Ways to practice gratitude:

  • Keep a gratitude journal
  • Keep a gratitude jar and put little notes in the jar each day
  • Observe “30” days of thanks. Post something you are grateful for or post a picture of something you are grateful for each day.
  • Thank 5 people who have an impact on your life and write each one a letter to express your gratitude.
  • There are also gratitude calendars that can be helpful
  • Practice mindfulness
  • Spend time with loved ones
  • Volunteer